18 9 / 2014

Andrej(a), the documentary.

On a snowy winter day in New York City, as I sat in my favorite Thai restaurant eating dinner with my dear friend and filmmaker Eric, along with his wife, I announced awkwardly “Eric, I have to tell you something. It’s intense. I don’t want to involve anyone else, just you. It’s very personal, I’ve told no one in the business, not even my agent. I am going to have SRS (sexual reassignment surgery) in two weeks!” 

At that point in time I didn’t have a strong desire to share what was about to happen with anyone but a few very close friends, certainly not a camera! Eric’s words changed my view forever. 

“This is a powerful part of an immensely courageous journey, we need to film this!” Eric said, his eyes beaming with excitement. “Your story is so unique. It has the potential to reach so many and to help millions of young people around the world. You need to do this! You know how many trans people (and people in general) are out there hiding, forced to live as someone they are not. You could give them hope by going public about this.” 

Eric had filmed me several times before for fashion gigs and other small pieces. If I was going to allow any camera to follow me through the most challenging period of my life, it was his. That is how this documentary was born, and since then it has become one my life’s missions. I ask you, fellow Kickstarters, to join and help me complete the film. I hope that by sharing my humanity, pain, tears, laughter, joy, and biggest struggles on film, it will shed light on what it means to live as a transgender individual. I have always believed that differences between people should not equal divisions and I simply want to create something that could help build a bridge between my community and the rest of the world. 

 - Andreja 

18 9 / 2014

Transgender model Andreja Pejic opens up.
(Article by Richard Peckett, Metro World News, 17 SEP 2014. Source.)
“I feel 100 percent complete,” says Andreja Pejic. “It’s about proving my position in the industry and speaking out for equal rights and gaining respect in fashion for transgender models, because it doesn’t exist right now.”
It’s a socially charged mission statement that you wouldn’t typically expect to hear from a model. However, there’s nothing typical about Andreja Pejic. Her white blonde hair, full lips, luminous complexion and high cheekbones all exemplify the checklist of model attributes. But it’s the fact that she has just undergone male-to-female sex reassignment surgery (SRS) and spoken out about it that makes Pejic unique among her peers.
“I have a level of social responsibility, and that’s one of the reasons for coming out and facing everything that is going to come afterwards,” she explains. It’s an incredibly brave decision to take considering that there is still a high level of antipathy targeted at the transgender community, not to mention the effect it can have on personal relationships – something Pejic calls the “social transition.”
Then there’s the matter of her very successful career as an androgynous male model for fashion houses such as Jean Paul Gaultier and Marc Jacobs. Her agents warned that transitioning would destroy her career. That, however, didn’t sway Pejic’s decision. “I’m very proud of my career as an androgynous model, but it got to a point where I needed to complete my dream and feel comfortable in my body. There was no way I was going to hide this,” she says.
Raising awarenessPejic is spreading awareness through an autobiographical book, which will be published in Australia early next year, and a documentary of her sex reassignment surgery.
Although she was originally unsure about filming her transition, her filmmaker friend Eric Miclette encouraged her, saying, “You need to capture this, you’ll regret it if you don’t. It’s a unique story and it can help a lot of young people.” The film, “Andrej(a),” is looking to raise $200,000 on Kickstarter.
On her love life “I’m single at the moment but it’s definitely more fun when you’re comfortable with yourself. I’ve been off the dating scene for a while but I’m open to love. I used to think that love wasn’t something I was deserving of, but now I have enough pride to say that it’s exactly what I deserve.”

Transgender model Andreja Pejic opens up.

(Article by Richard Peckett, Metro World News, 17 SEP 2014. Source.)

“I feel 100 percent complete,” says Andreja Pejic. “It’s about proving my position in the industry and speaking out for equal rights and gaining respect in fashion for transgender models, because it doesn’t exist right now.”

It’s a socially charged mission statement that you wouldn’t typically expect to hear from a model. However, there’s nothing typical about Andreja Pejic. Her white blonde hair, full lips, luminous complexion and high cheekbones all exemplify the checklist of model attributes. But it’s the fact that she has just undergone male-to-female sex reassignment surgery (SRS) and spoken out about it that makes Pejic unique among her peers.

“I have a level of social responsibility, and that’s one of the reasons for coming out and facing everything that is going to come afterwards,” she explains. It’s an incredibly brave decision to take considering that there is still a high level of antipathy targeted at the transgender community, not to mention the effect it can have on personal relationships – something Pejic calls the “social transition.”

Then there’s the matter of her very successful career as an androgynous male model for fashion houses such as Jean Paul Gaultier and Marc Jacobs. Her agents warned that transitioning would destroy her career. That, however, didn’t sway Pejic’s decision. “I’m very proud of my career as an androgynous model, but it got to a point where I needed to complete my dream and feel comfortable in my body. There was no way I was going to hide this,” she says.

Raising awareness
Pejic is spreading awareness through an autobiographical book, which will be published in Australia early next year, and a documentary of her sex reassignment surgery.

Although she was originally unsure about filming her transition, her filmmaker friend Eric Miclette encouraged her, saying, “You need to capture this, you’ll regret it if you don’t. It’s a unique story and it can help a lot of young people.” The film, “Andrej(a),” is looking to raise $200,000 on Kickstarter.

On her love life 
“I’m single at the moment but it’s definitely more fun when you’re comfortable with yourself. I’ve been off the dating scene for a while but I’m open to love. I used to think that love wasn’t something I was deserving of, but now I have enough pride to say that it’s exactly what I deserve.”

31 12 / 2013

hollyjollytwinksofthestoneage:

I BOUGHT MYSELF A DRESS AND NOW I AM INVINCIBLE

(Source: neondyke)

30 12 / 2013

(Source: transqueermediaexchange)

29 12 / 2013


shortformblog
:

A big victory for trans rights: A lot of insurance companies refuse to cover gender reassignment surgery, but Connecticut ruled last week that all insurers in the state have to cover both the surgery and other treatments related to gender dysphoria, including hormone therapy and counseling. The determination was based on two existing laws: One banning discrimination based on gender identity, and one requiring insurers to cover mental health treatment. Gender dysphoria is listed as a mental health disorder in the latest DSM; while there are a lot of reasons one could reasonably be upset about this, the upshot is that it gave the Connecticut Insurance Department additional legal justification for bolstering the rights of trans folk in the state. 

(via )

28 12 / 2013

03 10 / 2013

Trans man chooses death after botched surgical transition.
After a childhood of neglect, a Belgian man said he ‘did not want to be a monster’ before asking a doctor to euthanize him. [02 OCTOBER 2013 | BY JOE MORGAN (Source.)]


A trans man has chosen to be killed after his body rejected surgery to complete his transition.
Nathan Verhelst, 44, from Belgium, said he had ‘unbearable psychological suffering’ and asked a doctor to euthanize him.
On Monday afternoon (30 September), he died from a lethal injection.
Back in 2009, Verhelst started hormone therapy and had a mastectomy. Last year, he underwent surgery to construct a penis.
But when he looked in the mirror, his body was rejecting the surgery.
‘None of these operations worked as desired,’ Verhelst told a Belgian newspaper, hours before he went to die.
‘I was ready to celebrate my new birth, but when I looked in the mirror, I was disgusted with myself.
‘My new breasts did not match my expectations and my new penis had symptoms of rejection.
‘I did not want to be a monster.’
The man who carried out the lethal injection was Professor Wim Distelmans, a controversial figure who last year ended the lives of deaf twins who were going blind. Euthanasia is legal in Belgium as long as certain conditions are met.
Verhelst informed his family of his decision to die in a letter. ‘I had happy times, but the balance is on the wrong side,’ he said.
He recalled how his mother had loved his brothers, but appeared to hate him because he was born in the body of a girl.
‘While my brothers were celebrated,’ he said, ‘I got a storage room above the garage as a bedroom.
‘My mother complained, “If only you had been a boy”.’
Verhelst’s mother confirmed she had not wanted him.
‘When I saw [Nathan’s birth name] for the first time, my dream was shattered. She was so ugly. I had a phantom birth. Her death does not bother me,’ his mother told Het Laatste Nieuws newspaper.
‘I will definitely read the letter but it will be full of lies.
‘For me, this chapter is closed. Her death does not bother me. I feel no sorrow, no doubt or remorse. We never had a bond.’

Trans man chooses death after botched surgical transition.

After a childhood of neglect, a Belgian man said he ‘did not want to be a monster’ before asking a doctor to euthanize him. [02 OCTOBER 2013 | BY JOE MORGAN (Source.)]

A trans man has chosen to be killed after his body rejected surgery to complete his transition.

Nathan Verhelst, 44, from Belgium, said he had ‘unbearable psychological suffering’ and asked a doctor to euthanize him.

On Monday afternoon (30 September), he died from a lethal injection.

Back in 2009, Verhelst started hormone therapy and had a mastectomy. Last year, he underwent surgery to construct a penis.

But when he looked in the mirror, his body was rejecting the surgery.

‘None of these operations worked as desired,’ Verhelst told a Belgian newspaper, hours before he went to die.

‘I was ready to celebrate my new birth, but when I looked in the mirror, I was disgusted with myself.

‘My new breasts did not match my expectations and my new penis had symptoms of rejection.

‘I did not want to be a monster.’

The man who carried out the lethal injection was Professor Wim Distelmans, a controversial figure who last year ended the lives of deaf twins who were going blind. Euthanasia is legal in Belgium as long as certain conditions are met.

Verhelst informed his family of his decision to die in a letter. ‘I had happy times, but the balance is on the wrong side,’ he said.

He recalled how his mother had loved his brothers, but appeared to hate him because he was born in the body of a girl.

‘While my brothers were celebrated,’ he said, ‘I got a storage room above the garage as a bedroom.

‘My mother complained, “If only you had been a boy”.’

Verhelst’s mother confirmed she had not wanted him.

‘When I saw [Nathan’s birth name] for the first time, my dream was shattered. She was so ugly. I had a phantom birth. Her death does not bother me,’ his mother told Het Laatste Nieuws newspaper.

‘I will definitely read the letter but it will be full of lies.

‘For me, this chapter is closed. Her death does not bother me. I feel no sorrow, no doubt or remorse. We never had a bond.’

30 9 / 2013

Gender doesn’t make me who I am.

29 9 / 2013

demonsonthemoon:

You know what? I really admire people who can live without labels. I really admire people who can live knowing that they’re non-binary but do not feel the need to define their gender. I really admire people who are sometimes sexually attracted and sometimes not but aren’t exactly demisexual and do not feel the need to clarify more than that. I really admire people who are attracted to more than one gender but that’s just that for them and they don’t need to ask themselves if they’re bisexual, pansexual or anything else. I really admire people who don’t believe in any religion but don’t feel the need to call themselves agnostic or atheist, because they just don’t need a belief to identify as themselves.

I really admire people who can live without labels. Because the truth is, I don’t really think I can. Defining a part of myself that’s been troubling me with a word is relieving. It’s comforting. Knowing that I can identify as this word, that has a definition, gives me meaning too, it reassures me by telling me I’m not wrong, I’m not broken, because who I am is a thing that exists.

What I’m saying is… Some people find labels important. Some people don’t. Some find them reassuring. Some find them confining. It’s okay. I think. Destroying the labels because “we’re all the same” isn’t a good thing. Putting labels on everyone isn’t a good thing either, because we’re all different.

Someone is having a hard time finding who they are, what word best describe them? Tell them it’s okay. Tell them they don’t necessarily have to find a word. Then, help them look. Hold their hand as they look through pages and pages of online dictionary entries. And tell them it’s okay.

If they do find a word, use it. Use it like it’s their name and let them wear it like their favorite shirt. If they don’t find a word, love them. Cherish the syllables of their favorite nickname and make them feel like that, that deserves to be put in a dictionary.

And the only think you need to be careful about, is that labels aren’t supposed to be boxes. They’re more like big old comforters. You can curl up inside them, and it makes you feel safe and relaxed, but once they get itchy or start to suffocate you, you can kick them off of your bed without it hurting anyone.

Words are important. But sometimes they’re also unnecessary. And it’s okay.

(Source: praisethejellyfishes)

28 9 / 2013

(Source: trappedinthewrongbody)